Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10
with predispositions to deadly diseases. you probably know that science has made giant leaps in detecting and treating some of those illnesses, but what you probably don't know is that at the same time, biotech companies have been patenting human genes. that's right. whether you like it or not, a vital part of who you are may now belong to someone else. >> let me just examine him. >> people are worried more than ever about how the chemicals we're exposed to are affecting our health. among them, a family of chemicals used in everyday plastics known as phthalates, which congress banned in toys after a study by dr. shanna swan. welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm lesley stahl. we'll be exploring the world of science in this episode. later we'll bring you morley safer's story about the human genome patents being awarded to biotech companies and the proprietary control they now have over part of who you are. and then my report on a ubiquitous chemical called phthalates, which is in everything from perfume to children's toys, but which may also be causing birth defects. but first, steve kroft's story on the
are now on the lower end of the curve. below average in math and science. this is a competitive crisis for american business. why are we not succeeding here? what's being done to fix it? two leading people on the american education charge. first, though, to sue at the nyse. >> thank you very much. a rough day for the dow jones industrial average. we are off of our lows but still up 21% this year. right now the dow jones industrial average down 104 points. transports have been on a huge tear, down today, but up 35% year to date. the s&p also in the red today. it's up 25% this year. it's down just 7.3 points today. similar story at the nasdaq, up 27% year to date. let's bring in bp and kenny polcari, director o'neill's security and cnbc market analyst. we've been talking about the pivot point in the market, the turn in the market when it would come. is this what we're seeing today? >> i think it feels like. the only thing you have to be careful of, not a the lo of volume. we've only done 300 million shares which tells you the big the boys are sitting out and waiting. does feel like it wa
in this gray area of law and science, and there are plenty of patients eager to follow the trail he's blazing. the ones we talked to in las vegas, all eager to remain young and vital, consider this a lifestyle choice, and they're prepared to roll the dice. you aren't concerned that five years from now, somebody might do a study and find out that this regimen accelerates the growth of cancer cells or causes diabetes? >> well, that's happened with prescriptive drugs. i mean, has it not? so this is any-- in any field you're doing this. they're taken drugs off the market because of this. >> so you'd rather feel better now while you're living your life than worry about the possibly downside 10 or 15 years from now? >> you could get killed on the interstate tomorrow. i mean, my goodness. i mean, it's-- you have to weigh risks and rewards. you do that every day in life. you do it when you get up in the morning. >> are you sure, are you absolutely positive, absent any scientific studies, that the treatments that you're giving now won't prove to be detrimental to someone's health five, 10, 15 years fr
terrestrial landing map en route to the moon. it's being haled as a major milestone to the science program. china will send someone to the moon in 2020 now that we can no longer send someone to the moon. >> we know what's there. we're worried about what they want to use it for at this point. what is this jade thing, it drives around? >> yeah, like a buggy that will go around and check out the surface. >> maybe if it drives everywhere it could find a moon rock more interesting than what we've got. if they could cover the whole rock, the whole satellite. >> maybe they're going to deliver packages. >> maybe they're going to do that. >> deliver amazon packages to the moon. >> i love the moon, it's beautiful. it makes you feel nice, but i'm done with the moon. we need to go somewhere else to make it interesting. >> one of these 40 billion earth like planets that are supposed to be out there nerds, listen up. the largest known private memorabilia collection from the "lord of the rings" collection will be released this week. there will also be props used by the evil ring reichs, prosthetic hobbit
with drones. >> i know this looks like science fiction. it's not. this is early, still years away. it drops the package, and we can do half-hour delivery, and we can carry objects we think up to five pounds. >> will this plan really fly? joining us to discuss is jon fortt and eamon javers. and vice president at amazon. mr. berman, let me stop with you. i don't want to use an antique metaphor, get the cart before the horse, because there are a lot of operational details. i'm thinking -- i applaud you guys for thinking crazy thoughts, but are you guys serious? >> well, you know, at amazon we like to think big. what's bigger than trying to get it delivered to the doorstep in 30 minutes? again, this is years away. there's a lot of work that needs to be done. we can temper things a bit, but as jeff said, we don't see this as science fiction, as something that's viability, yet years down the road. >> you build facilities like the one behind you on audacity and big thoughts and thinking craziyly, but speaking of crazy, i can see the guys from "duck dynasty" having an awful lot of fun with these dr
you offer is this. >> you can learn things focussing on technology and computer science, being computer literate and so on to go and learn about big data or about how to do stuff on the web. you learn this online. go there, sign up and take a class. some of our classes are free. we also offer services such as mentoring, coaching and examination. you work with google and facebook to put their materials online. we get from them the most up to date, cutting edge stuff you need to know to be successful in the career of tech. you can learn this stuff. facebook teaches internally to it's engineers. so if you as a person want to be proficient in big data, go and sign up. >> does this replace a college degree or someone in the work place can use to add on a constant life learning, learning, learning? >> we think of it like a letter like continued learning, life long learning, staying up to date. our data suggests that too. very few come to us straight out of college or in college. most come to us, young professionals that want to understand the latest and best in technology. things tur
differently, though, it seems. >> yes. the science is still very much not conclusive regarding that. there have been no real solid tests of these kinds of devices which can be manipulated to have a lot of nicotine, a little bit of nicotine and new york city is really kind of following the lead of many, many -- well, many jurisdictions throughout the country and three states. currently 20 million americans live in states or local jurisdictions where tobacco products are treated just like e cigarettes. and we're just kind of catching up. we think it's important to not have a situation where we're renormalizing the act of smoking. and also gets in the way of us doing proper -- proper enforcement of the current anti-smoking bills we have now, because they look-alike. this is causing confusion. we want to err on the side of caution as many states and localities have already done. we think this is a prudent next step to make sure we do not renormalize smoking and have people subject to these vapors which are very much unknown. >> thinking back to the original smoking ban you referred to,
courses from one of the world's greatest universities. also a professor of computer science at m.i.t. gentlemen, welcome to both of you. we were talking off camera about how there is a massive need right now to train people to be qualified to take the jobs that are available. the gap in skills. how big of a problem is that? and i would guess that's a big part of the reason that you do what you do, both of you. >> today there's about 3 1/2 million jobs we can't fill because there's a lack of skilled workers to fill them. let's take california, for example. there are in a lot of them are going into nursing, education. the mean age of a nurse in california, 58. >> that's crazy. >> it's actually insane. what it means is the system hasn't responded to demand. when i talk to large employers, what they typically tell me is we get tons of applications for front line jobs. we don't have enough folks that we can go out into the marketplace and recruit into management. >> and that's the goal that university now is trying to find and take those people directly for those jobs? >> correct. we'
plant et, science. overall strategy was, make discovery and tlc stronger but invest in a lot of new channels, velocity's another new channel. market share has grown to 11% of viewership on cable. we grew our portfolio 4% in a mark that's flat. year before we were up six. the year before up four. >> do you think you can keep doing it? >> that's the question. >> we think we can. this year we grew four. and we still believe, if you tell great stories with great characters under a strong brand, more people will watch. in the u.s. we're going continue to do that. i think we can continue to win. on tonigp of that in the u.s. viewership has flattened out and subscribers have flattened out. the advertising mark remains strong. the ability to get cpm growth when the differential between the broadcast cpm and cable still significant, it's a big helper. and in the u.s., we're getting paid more money for our content. we have netflix and amazon buying content. ability to get higher subfees from the distributors in the u.s. has gotten better. >> there may be weakness in the scatter mark, have you
know this looks like science fiction. it's not. >> wow. >> this is early. this is still years away. drops the package. >> there's the package. >> come and get your package. we can do half-hour delivery. >> half-hour delivery? >> half-hour delivery and carry objects we think up to five pounds. >> that service amazon prime air could be ready for use in four or five years and could carry objects to discuss merles within a ten-mile radius of a distribution center. when's the worst that could happen? tweet us. we'll get your responses later on in the morning. people had ideas already about worse worst-case scenarios. >> try landing in the streets in manhattan. >> yes. >> the other thing is have you noticed how innocent they look? cute little drones. as time goes on, you can see it's the future. presumably they're armed or they'll -- >> hellfires on there. >> did you see quot blif i don't know" with tom cruise? >> no. it was a part of "homeland." >> i won't give away more. >> thank you very much. they keep innovating and, carl, we have seen apparently they're not the first to think about
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10